Potential Dangers and Risks

Power caution

The amount of power that cables may deliver can differ for different devices. For example: If you use a cable that draws more power than a port can handle, you could harm the port.

Cables are supposed to contain safeguards. Sometimes manufacturers cut corners to reduce cost and don’t follow standards, including the implementation of these safeguards.

Cables which are not compliant can cause serious damage

Buying Cables Online

  • Read reviews from wherever you are buying your cables. Make sure people are using for the same purposes as you (transferring data, streaming video to a TV/monitor, etc).
If buying inexpensive cables, BE VERY CAREFUL AND LOOK FOR CERTIFICATIONS AND REVIEWS

Connecting to Monitors and laptops

    • Use a specific cable for power and data transfer (usually marked with a DisplayPort or Thunderbolt symbol)
    • Always double check cable capabilities before using to power laptops or monitors
NEVER USE A CHEAP CABLE TO CHARGE YOUR COMPUTER *NEVER USE A 3A USB C CABLE TO POWER A LAPTOP OR MONITOR*

Identifying your cable

If you are still unsure of what kind of USB C cable you have after looking for product specifications and checking comments on the product page, look for one of the below symbols on the cable to identify the cable type. 

Even if you are correctly able to identify the cable, never use a cable to power a laptop or monitor unless you are certain the cable supports 5A and you have double checked online resources about the specific cable you are using.

components_usb_protocols.png
image: USB C wikipedia page
This guide was first published on Nov 27, 2019. It was last updated on Nov 27, 2019. This page (Potential Dangers and Risks) was last updated on Dec 05, 2019.