Source Code

If this is your first time using Trinket or Gemma, work through the Introducing Trinket or Introducing Gemma guide first; you need to customize some settings in the Arduino IDE. Once you have it up and running (test the “blink” sketch), then continue…

In the Arduino IDE, create a new sketch (File→New), then copy and paste the following code (click the “copy code” link at the top right, switch to the Arduino IDE and select Edit→Paste).

The program is fairly small but uses some advanced techniques, so don’t be alarmed if a lot of it is unfamiliar. The important stuff you’ll actually be editing is on the next page.

// Trinket/Gemma + LED matrix backpack jewelry.  Plays animated
// sequence on LED matrix.  Press reset button to display again,
// or add optional momentary button between pin #1 and +V.
// THERE IS NO ANIMATION DATA IN THIS SOURCE FILE, you should
// rarely need to change anything here.  EDIT anim.h INSTEAD.

#define BRIGHTNESS   12 // 0=min, 15=max
#define I2C_ADDR   0x70 // Edit if backpack A0/A1 jumpers set

#include <Wire.h>
#include <avr/power.h>
#include <avr/sleep.h>
#include "anim.h"       // Animation data is located here

static const uint8_t PROGMEM reorder[] = { // Column-reordering table
    0x00,0x40,0x20,0x60,0x10,0x50,0x30,0x70,0x08,0x48,0x28,0x68,0x18,0x58,0x38,0x78,
    0x04,0x44,0x24,0x64,0x14,0x54,0x34,0x74,0x0c,0x4c,0x2c,0x6c,0x1c,0x5c,0x3c,0x7c,
    0x02,0x42,0x22,0x62,0x12,0x52,0x32,0x72,0x0a,0x4a,0x2a,0x6a,0x1a,0x5a,0x3a,0x7a,
    0x06,0x46,0x26,0x66,0x16,0x56,0x36,0x76,0x0e,0x4e,0x2e,0x6e,0x1e,0x5e,0x3e,0x7e,
    0x01,0x41,0x21,0x61,0x11,0x51,0x31,0x71,0x09,0x49,0x29,0x69,0x19,0x59,0x39,0x79,
    0x05,0x45,0x25,0x65,0x15,0x55,0x35,0x75,0x0d,0x4d,0x2d,0x6d,0x1d,0x5d,0x3d,0x7d,
    0x03,0x43,0x23,0x63,0x13,0x53,0x33,0x73,0x0b,0x4b,0x2b,0x6b,0x1b,0x5b,0x3b,0x7b,
    0x07,0x47,0x27,0x67,0x17,0x57,0x37,0x77,0x0f,0x4f,0x2f,0x6f,0x1f,0x5f,0x3f,0x7f,
    0x80,0xc0,0xa0,0xe0,0x90,0xd0,0xb0,0xf0,0x88,0xc8,0xa8,0xe8,0x98,0xd8,0xb8,0xf8,
    0x84,0xc4,0xa4,0xe4,0x94,0xd4,0xb4,0xf4,0x8c,0xcc,0xac,0xec,0x9c,0xdc,0xbc,0xfc,
    0x82,0xc2,0xa2,0xe2,0x92,0xd2,0xb2,0xf2,0x8a,0xca,0xaa,0xea,0x9a,0xda,0xba,0xfa,
    0x86,0xc6,0xa6,0xe6,0x96,0xd6,0xb6,0xf6,0x8e,0xce,0xae,0xee,0x9e,0xde,0xbe,0xfe,
    0x81,0xc1,0xa1,0xe1,0x91,0xd1,0xb1,0xf1,0x89,0xc9,0xa9,0xe9,0x99,0xd9,0xb9,0xf9,
    0x85,0xc5,0xa5,0xe5,0x95,0xd5,0xb5,0xf5,0x8d,0xcd,0xad,0xed,0x9d,0xdd,0xbd,0xfd,
    0x83,0xc3,0xa3,0xe3,0x93,0xd3,0xb3,0xf3,0x8b,0xcb,0xab,0xeb,0x9b,0xdb,0xbb,0xfb,
    0x87,0xc7,0xa7,0xe7,0x97,0xd7,0xb7,0xf7,0x8f,0xcf,0xaf,0xef,0x9f,0xdf,0xbf,0xff };

void ledCmd(uint8_t x) { // Issue command to LED backback driver
  Wire.beginTransmission(I2C_ADDR);
  Wire.write(x);
  Wire.endTransmission();
}

void clear(void) { // Clear display buffer
  Wire.beginTransmission(I2C_ADDR);
  for(uint8_t i=0; i<17; i++) Wire.write(0);
  Wire.endTransmission();
}

void setup() {
  power_timer1_disable();    // Disable unused peripherals
  power_adc_disable();       // to save power
  PCMSK |= _BV(PCINT1);      // Set change mask for pin 1
  Wire.begin();              // I2C init
  clear();                   // Blank display
  ledCmd(0x21);              // Turn on oscillator
  ledCmd(0xE0 | BRIGHTNESS); // Set brightness
  ledCmd(0x81);              // Display on, no blink
}

uint8_t rep = REPS;

void loop() {

  for(int i=0; i<sizeof(anim); i) { // For each frame...
    Wire.beginTransmission(I2C_ADDR);
    Wire.write(0);                  // Start address
    for(uint8_t j=0; j<8; j++) {    // 8 rows...
      Wire.write(pgm_read_byte(&reorder[pgm_read_byte(&anim[i++])]));
      Wire.write(0);
    }
    Wire.endTransmission();
    delay(pgm_read_byte(&anim[i++]) * 10);
  }

  if(!--rep) {             // If last cycle...
    ledCmd(0x20);          // LED matrix in standby mode
    GIMSK = _BV(PCIE);     // Enable pin change interrupt
    power_all_disable();   // All peripherals off
    set_sleep_mode(SLEEP_MODE_PWR_DOWN);
    sleep_enable();
    sei();                 // Keep interrupts disabled
    sleep_mode();          // Power down CPU (pin 1 will wake)
    // Execution resumes here on wake.
    GIMSK = 0;             // Disable pin change interrupt
    rep   = REPS;          // Reset animation counter
    power_timer0_enable(); // Re-enable timer
    power_usi_enable();    // Re-enable USI
    Wire.begin();          // Re-init I2C
    clear();               // Blank display
    ledCmd(0x21);          // Re-enable matrix
  }
}

ISR(PCINT0_vect) {} // Button tap

We’re not done yet!

On the next page, we’ll create the graphics for some alien creatures. You can skip ahead if you just want to finish the pendant, or read on for the geeky code details…

Normally when using these matrices we recommend using the Adafruit LED Backpack Library. Because library installation is often a trouble spot, this code minimizes extra library use and instead needs to do a few things “raw,” and it’s a bit intimidating as a result. So it’s okay just to copy and paste the code and proceed to the next step if you prefer.

The code starts by disabling the chip’s Timer1 and analog-to-digital converter to save a little power and extend battery life; they’re not used by this program. Then it initializes the HT16K33 matrix driver chip (using the TinyWireM library, a Trinket/Gemma equivalent to the Arduino “Wire” library for the I²C protocol), clearing the image memory, setting the brightness and enabling the display (brightness is set with a #define near the top of the code…lower numbers are dimmer, but improve battery life).

The program then loops one or more times, reading animation frames from flash memory (we’ll explain that on the next page), issuing the bitmap data to the matrix driver and displaying each image for a short period. The big table lookup is because the matrix columns aren’t wired in-order on the Backpack board; this re-orders the bits in memory to match the column order.

At the end of the sequence, both the LED matrix driver and the CPU are put into a low-power state to help preserve battery life. A pin-change interrupt is enabled on pin #1 that will wake the CPU from sleep and restart the animation. This button is optional; you can use the onboard reset button as well (though it will have a brief delay as the bootloader starts).
Last updated on 2016-02-08 at 11.16.47 PM Published on 2013-10-01 at 09.15.35 PM