Connecting to the Arduino

These boards communicate using an SPI protocol. The wiring is slightly different for the two boards, so we will describe them separately. For making breadboard connections with the header pins on top of the board, a set of male-female jumpers are handy.

The pin configurations below are consistent with the example code supplied with the libraries:

24-Channel TLC5947

Connect to the Arduino as follows:

  • DIN -> Digital 4
  • CLK -> Digital 5
  • LAT -> Digital 6
  • GND -> GND
  • V+ -> VIN

Here we show V+ connected to the Arduino VIN pin. This will power the breakout board and LED directly from the supply connected to the DC power jack. The TLC5947 can accept a V+ of 5v-30v. Higher voltages allow you to drive multiple LEDs in series from each channel.

The DIN/CLK/LAT pins can be changed to any other pins later

If you need V+ voltages higher than 12v, you will need to use a separate power supply. If you use a separate supply, be sure to connect the ground wire to the Arduino ground.

12-Channel TLC59711

You've got two options for powering/wiring your TLC59711

  1. LEDs V+ and logic level VCC connected together to 3 - 5V
  2. LEDs V+ at 4-17V and logic level VCC at 3.3V

If you need to use it with a 5V logic UNO, you can do either of the following two wiring diagrams:

Connect V+ and VCC to 5VDC (this is the best and easiest option)

Connect V+ to 4-17V and keep VCC disconnected. Then use 10K resistors or a level shifter between the clock and data wires going into the first of the TLC59711

If you are using a 3.3V logic Arduino, you have two wiring options:

Keep VCC disconnected, and connect V+ to 4-17V

Connect VCC and V+ together to 3.3V (if a 4V+ power source is not available)

Other than that, connect to the Arduino as follows:

  • DI -> Digital 11
  • CI -> Digital 13
  • GND -> GND

The DI/CI pins can be changed to any other pins later

If you need V+ voltages higher than 12v, you will need to use a separate power supply. If you use a separate supply, be sure to connect the ground wire to the Arduino ground.

Chaining Boards

Multiple boards can be chained to control hundreds of LEDs. Using an Arduino, you will run out of memory long before you exceed the chaining capacity of these boards!

Header connections at both ends of the board make chaining simple. Our 6-Conductor 0.1" Socket-Socket Cable is perfect for linking them together.

The next two pages will show you how to connect some LEDs and test them out with the library example sketch:
This guide was first published on Dec 06, 2013. It was last updated on Dec 06, 2013. This page (Connecting to the Arduino) was last updated on Dec 28, 2016.