Circuit Diagram

EagleCAD

I designed a simple board in EagleCAD. The 7 LEDs are connected in parallel. A JST connector connects directly to power and ground. A slide switch goes in between the JST and first LED to act as an On/Off switch.

 

Here's a quick breakdown of the board dimension (case you're interested).

  • 50.8mm x 50.8mm
  • 2.54mm holes
  • 45.72mm hole distance

If you're interested in making the board yourself, but don't have access to a CNC mill, you could send it to a PCB service such as OSHPark.com

Circuit Diagram

Here's a simple diagram depicting how to connect several LEDs in parallel. If you plan on free wiring them, you'll have to plan out the best way to do so.

PCB Milling

We milled the PCB on an Othermill Pro with FR-1 single sided boards using a 1/32" flat end mill.

Circuit Components

We used the follow parts to assemble the circuit.

Inserting LEDs

The LEDs are connected in parrallel with the anodes and cathodes matching their respected traces. Follow the EagleCAD drawing to see which side they go. The LEDs are not flush with PCB, exposing a short amount of legs - This makes it easier to solder them to the copper layer.

JST-PH Connector

The JST-PH 2-pin connector is a surface mounted component that's a little trickey to solder in place. A piece of tape or mounting tack can hold it in place while soldering the 2-pins.

Connect Slide Switch and Battery

Remove the third leg from the slide switch and insert it to the positive/power trace with the two holes - this will allow to turn on and off the circuit. The legs from the switch are half way through the PCB - similar to the LEDs, this makes it easier to solder them to the copper layer. Once the components are secured, trim off the excess legs from the LEDs and slide switch. Test the circuit by connect the battery to the JST connector and turning the slide switch on. It's also helpful to continuity on the traces using a multi-meter.

This guide was first published on Aug 10, 2016. It was last updated on Aug 10, 2016. This page (Circuit Diagram) was last updated on Oct 30, 2019.