3D Printing

FDM 3D Printing

These parts are optimized to print with desktop 3D Printers capable of printing in ABS or PLA material with a minium build area of 100mm x 100mm x 90mm.  The five parts are designed to print without any support material. 

Parts Breakdown

macpi-body.stl
This is the largest part and has four stand-offs on the top and bottom for inserting magenets. The macpi-front.stl and macpi-back.stl parts snap onto the body for easily accessing the internal components.

macpi-front.stl
The front bezel of the design features three stand-offs with 1.5mm mount holes for securing the PiTFT display with #4-40 machine screws. This part features four stand-offs in the corners for inserting magnets. This part snaps to the macpi-body.stl part

macpi-back.stl
A stereo amplifier is mounted to this part with two #40-40 screws. A panel mount HDMI cable is secrued to this part for accessing HDMI out on the Raspberry Pi. 

macpi-base.stl
The battery and powerboost 500c are housed in this part. It is secured to the side of the macpi-body.stl part that has four mounting holes. #4-40 screws secure the macpi-base.stl and macpi-body.stl part together. 

macpi-bottom.stl
The powerboost 500c is mounted to this part with 2 #4-40 machine screws. This part is secured to the macpi-base.stl part with 4 #4-40 screws.

PLA or ABS?

We recommend printing the parts in PLA material. ABS prints tend to warp especially with surfaces that feature filets and chamfers. Use either 1.75mm or 3mm diameter filaments, which ever your printer is optimized for. 

Slicer Settings

The slicer settings are going to vary from printer to printer, but we recommend using the settings below as a reference for tweaking the settings. The slicing settings was generated using MakerWare and the prints were tested on a makerbot Replicator 1 and Replicator 2.

macpi-back.stl
macpi-base.stl
macpi-body.stl
macpi-bottom.stl
macpi-front.stl

PLA @230c
2 shells
10% infill
0.2mm layer height
90/120 speeds

 

Takes about 6-8 hours to print all parts.

Don't Have a 3D Printer? 

Your neighbor or local hackerspace might have a 3D printer you can 'borrow'. There are a few great services that can print the parts out and ship them to you. Check out these below or consult your own google search.

  • Shapeways
  • Sculpteo
  • i.materialise
  • 3DHubs
  • MakeXZY
This guide was first published on Aug 27, 2014. It was last updated on Aug 27, 2014. This page (3D Printing) was last updated on Nov 19, 2019.