If you'd like to try 3D printing the sorter instead of printing and folding it out of paper, you're in luck because we designed 3D printable versions of the chute and sorter arm.

To improve the advancement of items down the chute you can add a vibrational motor to the design, which improves the feeding consistency.

Experimenter's warning: this method is not fool-proof and requires some tweaking

Download and print the below files if you'd like to experiment with the 3D printed version of the sorter.

  • Mount the servo to the sorter via the screw (comes with most micro servos).
  • Make sure the servo wires are oriented towards the top of the sorter and come down the back through the groove.
  • Lastly, attach the basket piece via tape or glue to the servo arm.

Creating a better feeding mechanism

  • The 3D printed sorter, because of it's density and weight, needs a bit more of a nudge than just the servo to move the bits down the chute. By adding a vibrating motor disc and soldering to a coin cell powered breakout, the bits can more easily flow down the chute.
  • This method is not full-proof but it does help!
  • We found that cereal and marshmallows didn't work as well as more dense items like peanut m&ms.
  • Experiment and see what works for you!

Vibrating Mini Motor Disc

PRODUCT ID: 1201
*BZZZZZZZZZZ* Feel that? That's your little buzzing motor, and for any haptic feedback project you'll want to pick up a few of them. These vibe motors are tiny discs,...
$1.95
IN STOCK

20mm Coin Cell Breakout w/On-Off Switch (CR2032)

PRODUCT ID: 1871
Simple but effective - this sewable breakout board has a CR2032 coin cell battery holder soldered on, an on/off switch and 0.1" pitch breakout pins for easy connecting. Great for...
$3.50
IN STOCK

CR2032 Lithium Coin Cell Battery

PRODUCT ID: 654
A perfect match for our sew-able coin cell holder. This non-rechargeable coin cell is CR2032 sized: 20mm diameter, 3.2mm thick. It...
$0.95
IN STOCK
This guide was first published on Jan 27, 2020. It was last updated on Jan 27, 2020.
This page (3D Printing (optional)) was last updated on Oct 16, 2020.