This funky user interface element is reminiscent of the original clicking scroll wheel interface on the first iPods. It's a fancy mechanical kit but has an intuitiveness that is hard to argue with - everyone knows how to use this kind of rotary encoder to scroll and select.

This product is just the encoder/button wheel element. The pin-out is a little odd, but, you could solder to the pins if you like.

There are 5 buttons (up down left right center) and a rotary encoder wheel in the center. Use with any microcontroller that can read pulse-code rotary encoders!

To deal with the odd pinout we made a handy breakout board that converts the funky pin set into a straightforward, breadboard-friendly header strip.

There's no pull-up or pull-down resistors on this PCB, and of course you'll need to solder the encoder onto the breakout. Then use your microcontroller's button and rotary encoder library/hardware support to interface with the pins.

You'll need 7 GPIO total: 5 buttons and 2 rotary encoder pins. There's also two COMmon pins, which you can set to ground or VCC - usually ground so that you can use the microcontroller internal pull-ups for the button/encoders. Note: to make our wiring simple, our example code uses GPIO to the COM's and then sets then to outputs, but you can just wire them directly.

This guide was first published on Oct 05, 2021. It was last updated on 2021-10-05 17:15:44 -0400.

This page (Overview) was last updated on Oct 09, 2021.

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