Breadboard Layout

As we have eight LEDs and eight resistors to connect up, there are actually quite a few connections to be made.
It is probably easiest to put the 74HC595 chip in first, as pretty much everything else connects to it. Put it so that the little U-shaped notch is towards the top of the breadboard. Pin 1 of the chip is to the left of this notch.
  • Digital 4 from the arduino goes to pin #14 of the shift register
  • Digital 5 from the arduino goes to pin #12 of the shift register
  • Digital 6 from the arduino goes to pin #11 of the shift register
All but one of the outputs from the '595 are on the left hand side of the chip, hence, for ease of connection, that is where the LEDs are too.

After the chip, put the resistors in place. You need to be careful that none of the leads of the resistors are touching each other. You should check this again, before you connect the power to your Arduino. If you find it difficult to arrange the resistors without their leads touching, then it helps to shorten the leads so that they are lying closer to the surface of the breadboard.Next, place the LEDs on the breadboard.

The longer positive LED leads must all be towards the chip, whichever side of the breadboard they are on.

It now just remains to attach the jumper leads as shown above. Do not forget the one that goes from pin 8 of the IC to the GND column of the breadboard.

Load up the sketch listed a bit later and try it out. Each LED should light in turn until all the LEDs are on, and then they all go off and the cycle repeats.
This guide was first published on Dec 03, 2012. It was last updated on Dec 03, 2012. This page (Breadboard Layout) was last updated on Nov 21, 2019.