Overview

We recently converted to fully electric vehicles and now we have new charging cables to deal with.

 

In this project we’ll show you how we designed and 3d printed a mount for our Tesla charging adapter.

 

We didn’t want to drill any holes into the wall so we designed it to clip onto our shelves. It also doubles as a cable organizer!

The curve along the neck of the hanger allows the cable rest on. The hook on the back clips onto the flat side of the shelving, which also acts a clamp so it’s secured in place.

This works quite well and we’re pretty happy since we don’t have to leave our charger on the floor. We think this was a great exercise in practical 3D printing and hope this inspires you to create solutions around your work space!

We shared our design as a free to download so other folks can make their own. The source is also available so anyone can remix and modify!

Ultimaker 2+ 3D Printer

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Blue Masking Tape for 3D Printing Plates

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3D Printing

The 3D printed parts are fairly easy to make with most common home desktop 3D printers that are on the market.

 

And if you don’t have access a 3D printer, you can order our parts by visiting our Thingiverse page and have someone local 3D print the parts and ship them to you. 

 

We sketched out the profiles Using Autodesk Fusion 360 and formed a solid model by lofting between profiles.

 

It’s parametrically driven so it’s easy to make small adjustments which will come in handy when testing for tolerances.

Slice Settings

 

Download the STL file and import it into your 3D printing slicing software. You'll need to adjust your settings accordingly if you're using material different than PLA.

 

  • 220C Extruder Temp
  • 65C for heated bed
  • 1.0 Extrusion Multiplier
  • .4mm Nozzle
  • 0.38 Extrusion Width
  • .2mm Layer Height
  • 20% infill
  • Supports
  • Skirt
  • 60mm/s | 120mm travel speed
First, move the model on the Z axis so that is -.6mm. This will create a flat bottom to adhere to the print bed. 

Orientation

 

Oriented the part down on it’s side. This will lay the layer lines parallel with the load. There’s a bit of overhang near the bottom so added support material is needed.

 

Supports

 

Support material produces a scaffolding like structure that provides the overhang with something to lay on.

 

In cura, set the supports placement to: touching bed.


Set the overhang to 60 degrees and the support pattern to zig zag.


Support density is 15% with a Z distance of .3mm

 

Infill

 

We set the infill to 20% with a Triangle pattern. We also dropped infill and wall speeds to 50mm/s.

Assemble

Attaching holder

 

To attach the holder, position it at an angle and then apply a small amount of force the upper part of the clip. The clip portion of the model will click and then securely attach to the side of the shelf.  

Latch

 

When holstered, the top edge actually supports the plug connector and keeps it from slipping out. It’s easy to remove thanks to the clearance around the connector.

 

There’s also a curve along the neck of the hanger to allow the cable rest on. The hook on the back clips onto the flat side of the shelving which also acts a clamp so it’s secured in place.

Cable holder

 

We also design two sizes of standalone clips to hold additional extension cables. 

 

These are useful for thicker cables to help organize the attached power-brick on the charging cable.

 

 

And that's it! This works quite well and we’re pretty happy since we don’t have to leave our charger on the floor. We think this was a great exercise in practical 3D printing and hope this inspires you!

This guide was first published on Jan 31, 2018. It was last updated on Nov 16, 2018.